A weekend of Landscape Photography in the Lake District – Castlerigg, Derwentwater, Keswick, Ullswater and Red Squirrels!

Sunset at Castlerigg Hall Campsite

As it has seemed to turn into a bit of a tradition over the past few years, in the middle of April I ventured off for my annual landscape photography trip to Keswick in the Lake District. As last year I was meeting up and camping with a few photographer friends for what would hopefully be a great weekend of landscape photography and socialising. Unfortunately, after a dry spell, the weather forecast wasn’t looking great for the weekend we had chosen. So would it be worthwhile, or just a washout?

Read More»

Peak District Photography – Landscapes at Stanage Edge

Millstones at Stanage Edge

This morning I ventured out of the house nice and early to head off to Stanage Edge in the Peak District. A 5am start was in order for the 1 hour 45 minute drive to Derbyshire in order to (hopefully) get a nice sunrise!

Read More»

How to use filters in landscape photography part 2 – Solid NDs and the magic of the 10 stop filter!

Welcome back to the second part of my ‘How to use filters in landscape photography’ mini-tutorial.

In the first part we took a look at the graduated neutral density filter and how that was essential in being able to correctly expose an entire scene, bringing all the various light and dark areas back into the dynamic range of our camera’s sensor. If you’ve not read up on it then click the little link above (it’ll open in a new tab) and then come back here afterwards!

In this second part, we’ll take a look at the solid neutral density filter and how it can help you achieve a dramatic edge to your landscape photography… so read on!

Read More»

How to use filters in landscape photography part 1 – Dynamic range and ND grads.

Part two of the filters tutorial, covering solid ND filters and the 10 stopper is now available here

One of the most common questions I see on forums from both beginners and serious amateurs relates to landscape photography. Most of the time, they have seen a fantastic scene or an amazing sunset and they try and capture this on their camera and end up disappointed when they find that either they have recorded the sky perfectly and have a black foreground or have a fantastic foreground and a completely white sky.

Ring any bells? Read on…

Read More»